Cold, Hungry and in the Dark: Exploding the Natural Gas Supply Myth

Cold Hungry and in the Dark

Conventional wisdom has North America entering a new era of energy abundance thanks to shale gas. But has industry been honest? Cold, Hungry and in the Dark argues that declining productivity combined with increasing demand will trigger a crisis that will cause prices to skyrocket, damage the economy, and have a profound impact on the lives of nearly every North American.

Relying on faulty science, bought-and-paid-for-white papers masquerading as independent research and “industry consultants,” the “shale promoters” have vastly overstated the viable supply of shale gas resources for their own financial gain. This startling exposé, written by an industry insider, suggests that the stakes involved in the Enron scandal might seem like lunch money in comparison to the bursting of the natural gas bubble. Exhaustively researched and rigorously documented, Cold, Hungry and in the Dark:

  • Puts supply-and-demand trends under a microscope
  • Provides overwhelming evidence of the absurdity of the one hundred-year supply myth
  • Suggests numerous ways to mitigate the upcoming natural gas price spike

The mainstream media has told us that natural gas will be cheap and plentiful for decades, when nothing could be further from the truth. Forewarned is forearmed. Cold, Hungry and in the Dark is vital reading for anyone concerned about the inevitable economic impact of our uncertain energy future.

Bill Powers is the editor of Powers Energy Investor and sits on the board of directors of Calgary-based Arsenal Energy. He has devoted the last fifteen years to studying and analyzing the energy sector.

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How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens

How We Learn.In the tradition of The Power of Habit and Thinking, Fast and Slow comes a practical, playful, and endlessly fascinating guide to what we really know about learning and memory today—and how we can apply it to our own lives.

From an early age, it is drilled into our heads: Restlessness, distraction, and ignorance are the enemies of success. We’re told that learning is all self-discipline, that we must confine ourselves to designated study areas, turn off the music, and maintain a strict ritual if we want to ace that test, memorize that presentation, or nail that piano recital.

But what if almost everything we were told about learning is wrong? And what if there was a way to achieve more with less effort?

In How We Learn, award-winning science reporter Benedict Carey sifts through decades of education research and landmark studies to uncover the truth about how our brains absorb and retain information. What he discovers is that, from the moment we are born, we are all learning quickly, efficiently, and automatically; but in our zeal to systematize the process we have ignored valuable, naturally enjoyable learning tools like forgetting, sleeping, and daydreaming. Is a dedicated desk in a quiet room really the best way to study? Can altering your routine improve your recall? Are there times when distraction is good? Is repetition necessary? Carey’s search for answers to these questions yields a wealth of strategies that make learning more a part of our everyday lives—and less of a chore.

By road testing many of the counterintuitive techniques described in this book, Carey shows how we can flex the neural muscles that make deep learning possible. Along the way he reveals why teachers should give final exams on the first day of class, why it’s wise to interleave subjects and concepts when learning any new skill, and when it’s smarter to stay up late prepping for that presentation than to rise early for one last cram session. And if this requires some suspension of disbelief, that’s because the research defies what we’ve been told, throughout our lives, about how best to learn.

The brain is not like a muscle, at least not in any straightforward sense. It is something else altogether, sensitive to mood, to timing, to circadian rhythms, as well as to location and environment. It doesn’t take orders well, to put it mildly. If the brain is a learning machine, then it is an eccentric one. In How We Learn, Benedict Carey shows us how to exploit its quirks to our advantage.

The Presidency and Domestic Policy: Comparing Leadership Styles, FDR to Obama

Presidency and Domestic PolicyGenovese (Loyola Marymount Univ.), Belt (Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo), and Lammers (Univ. of Southern California) examine and compare the domestic policy leadership styles and strategies of presidents since 1933; this new edition adds George W. Bush’s and Barack Obama’s presidencies. They assess presidents’ leadership styles and strategies for governing by looking at their approaches to advising processes and decision making, administrative strategies, public leadership, and congressional leadership. Importantly, the book considers presidential leadership in the context in which presidents serve, recognizing that presidents have different opportunities to lead based on the times in which they are in office. They thus categorize presidents based on the political environments they faced (high-opportunity presidents, moderate-opportunity presidents, and low-opportunity presidents), and evaluate their leadership and success based on their opportunities. They argue that, given their levels of opportunity, different presidents overachieved while others underachieved. Each president has one chapter dedicated to discussing his presidency, and each chapter follows the same format. The book is clearly written, easy to understand, and full of interesting anecdotes to help support its arguments.   R. L. Welch West Texas A&M University Copyright 2014 American Library Association.

Children Living in Transition: Helping Homeless and Foster Care Children and Families

Children Living in TransitionSharing the daily struggles of children and families residing in transitional situations (homelessness or because of risk of homelessness, being connected with the child welfare system, or being new immigrants in temporary housing), this text recommends strategies for delivering mental health and intensive case-management services that maintain family integrity and stability. Based on work undertaken at the Center for the Vulnerable Child in Oakland, California, which has provided mental health and intensive case management to children and families living in transition for more than two decades, this volume outlines culturally sensitive practices to engage families that feel disrespected by the assistance of helping professionals or betrayed by their forgotten promises. Chapters discuss the Center’s staffers’ attempt to trace the influence of power, privilege, and beliefs on their education and their approach to treatment. Many U.S. children living in impoverished transitional situations are of color and come from generations of poverty, and the professionals they encounter are white, middle-class, and college-educated. The Center’s work to identify the influences or obstacles interfering with services for this target population is therefore critical to formulating more effective treatment, interaction, and care.

Student Assessment: Fast, Frequent and Formative

Student AssessmentIn this book, the author provides strategies and techniques, such as the use of graphic organizers, quick writes, and journaling, to be used as formative assessments. Specific information about each tool and recommendations for data analysis and implementation are provided, helping teachers to implement formative assessment effectively and efficiently and allow their students to “preset the reset button” and master the skills they need to be successful in the classroom.

Manufactured Crisis: The Untold Story of the Iran Nuclear Scare

Manufactured Crisis “Manufactured Crisis provides unique and timely background to the ongoing diplomacy around Iran’s nuclear technology program. In it, award-winning investigative journalist Gareth Porter offers a well documented critique of the official ‘western’ account of what the Iranian government has been doing, and why. In Manufactured Crisis, Porter brings together the results of his many years of research into the issue–including numerous interviews with former insiders. He shows that the origins of the Iran nuclear “crisis” lay not in an Iranian urge to obtain nuclear weapons but, rather, in a sustained effort by the United States and its allies to deny Iran its right, as guaranteed in the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, to have any nuclear program at all. The book highlights the impact that the United States’ alliance with Israel had on Washington’s pursuit of its Iran policy and sheds new light on the US strategy of turning the International Atomic Energy Agency into a tool of its anti-Iran policy.” — Amazon.com

Timing and Turnout : How Off-Cycle Elections Favor Organized Groups

.Timing and Turnout

Public policy in the United States is the product of decisions made by more than 500,000 elected officials, and the vast majority of those officials are elected on days other than Election Day. And because far fewer voters turn out for off-cycle elections, that means the majority of officials in America are elected by a politically motivated minority of Americans. Sarah F. Anzia is the first to systemically address the effects of election timing on political outcomes, and her findings are eye-opening.
The low turnout for off-cycle elections, Anzia argues, increases the influence of organized interest groups like teachers’ unions and municipal workers. While such groups tend to vote at high rates regardless of when the election is held, the low turnout in off-cycle years enhances the effectiveness of their mobilization efforts and makes them a proportionately larger bloc. Throughout American history, the issue of election timing has been a contentious one. Anzia’s book traces efforts by interest groups and political parties to change the timing of elections to their advantage, resulting in the electoral structures we have today. Ultimately, what might seem at first glance to be mundane matters of scheduling are better understood as tactics designed to distribute political power, determining who has an advantage in the electoral process and who will control government at the municipal, county, and state levels.

Why Global Poverty? A Companion Guide to the Film “The End of Poverty?”

Why Global PovertyGlobal poverty did not just happen: it is the result of the geo-politics of injustice stretching back centuries and continuing to our day. This book presents notes on the production of the film “The End of Poverty?”, a complete transcript of the film, and over seventy full interviews – including Joseph Stiglitz, Amartya Sen, John Perkins, Chalmers Johnson, Susan George, and Eric Toussaint – to give an in-depth account of the methods of global economic domination and ways to remedy worldwide injustice.

Stem Cells: A Very Short Introduction

Stem CellsEmbryonic stem cells have been hot-button topics in recent years, generating intense public interest as well as much confusion and misinformation. In this Very Short Introduction, leading authority Jonathan Slack offers a clear and informative overview of stem cells–what they are, what scientists do with them, what stem cell therapies are available today, and how they might be used in the future. Slack explains the difference between embryonic stem cells, which exist only in laboratory cultures, and tissue-specific stem cells, which exist in our bodies, and he discusses how embryonic stem cells may be used in the future to treat such illnesses as diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, heart disease, spinal trauma, and retinal degeneration. But he stresses that, despite important advances, the clinical applications of stem cells are still in their infancy and that most real stem cell therapy today is some form of bone marrow transplantation. Slack concludes by analyzing how medical innovation has occurred in this area in recent years and he draws out some of the lessons for the development of new therapies in the future.

Life Upon These Shores: Looking at African American History, 1513 – 2008

Life Upon These ShoresHenry Louis Gates, Jr., gives us a sumptuously illustrated landmark book tracing African American history from the arrival of the conquistadors to the election of Barack Obama.

Informed by the latest, sometimes provocative scholarship and including more than seven hundred images—ancient maps, fine art, documents, photographs, cartoons, posters—Life Upon These Shores focuses on defining events, debates, and controversies, as well as the signal achievements of people famous and obscure. Gates takes us from the sixteenth century through the ordeal of slavery, from the Civil War and Reconstruction through the Jim Crow era and the Great Migration; from the civil rights and black nationalist movements through the age of hip-hop to the Joshua generation. By documenting and illuminating the sheer diversity of African American involvement in American history, society, politics, and culture, Gates bracingly disabuses us of the presumption of a single “black experience.”

Life Upon These Shores is a book of major importance, a breathtaking tour de force of the historical imagination.